About

Transportation Issues Daily is on hiatus as of January 2014.

Transportation Issues Daily is a once-a-week e-newsletter and daily blog that provides short, plain-language stories about federal and Pacific NW transportation policy, funding and legislative issues.  It is designed for people who (a) rarely have the time to read lengthy articles, reports or newsletters, and/or (b) work in agencies and companies which don’t have government relations staff or lobbyists.

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Transportation Issues Daily also strives to promote the needs and positive impacts of all transportation modes in moving people and goods more safely, cleanly and efficiently, and on increasing jobs and economic vitality. TID stories often are linked and referenced by Politico’s Morning Transportation Report, the AASHTO Daily News Update, StreetsblogDC, transportation agencies and associations, and other transportation and political writers, newsletters and websites.

Please contact us to receive a free trial of the Monday e-newsletter, which usually contains stories not published on the website. Subscription rates are very affordable.

Our stories are concise and to-the-point, summarizing what it might mean for stakeholders and often describing what is likely to happen next.  The newsletter also outlines upcoming transportation-related Congressional, Administration and industry activities, and reviews the previous week’s activities.  Transportation Issues Daily readers are in all fifty states and include thousands representing all levels of government; construction, engineering, finance and other private sector companies, both political parties, all modes, the media, and national and regional associations of various interests.

Publisher Larry Ehl (learn more about him) draws upon nearly seventeen years of public and private sector experience in transportation policy, funding, and advocacy, and over twenty years in public and private sector government relations to help you better understand the complexities of transportation policy and funding, and legislative activities.

But you should know that he is biased. 

He believes that investing in transportation – all modes – will improve and sustain the vitality of our economy, communities and environment. So you’ll notice Transportation Issues Daily focuses on investing in all modes. If you’re looking for a bashing of roads, bicycles, transit, Democrats or Republicans – move along.  There are plenty of other websites and newsletters for that.  We may, however, get slightly snarky from time to time in our impatience with the legislative process and stakeholder infighting.

The stories of achievement and innovation aren’t often reported.  We believe most public agencies know what they’re doing, they want to do things correctly, and that they get it right nearly all of the time.  So you’ll notice Transportation Issues Daily focuses on the positive achievements and innovations of public agencies and the private sector.  Most media reports focus on the occasional shortcomings and missteps, and rarely include the nuances and mitigating circumstances of complicated transportation projects.   When an achievement or innovation is reported it is usually a one-day story that is soon forgotten and never revisited.

Finally, I believe transportation stakeholders could do a better job of telling the stories and explaining the issues – to each other but more importantly to the public.  So you’ll notice Transportation Issues Daily focuses on explaining the needs and benefits of transportation investment in kitchen-table language.  Hopefully I succeed more often than not, and provide you with some good examples and talking points which you can use to gain support for YOUR project or legislative/regulatory objective.

And because you are busy, Transportation Issues Daily focuses on keeping stories concise and to-the-point, summarizing what it might mean for you and what is likely to happen.  Because you rarely have the time to read lengthy articles, reports or newsletters.

That’s what Transportation Issues Daily is all about.

As a e-newsletter subscriber you will receive a short alert early Monday morning outlining upcoming transportation-related Congressional, Administration and industry activities, and reviewing the previous week’s activities.  These stories contain links to the most critical congressional hearings and related briefing materials, and industry reports.

As a subscriber you will also occasionally receive special stories in advance (such as grant announcements, or analysis of committee legislative activity), or stories offering deeper analysis beyond what’s available on the webpage.

If you’re looking for a one-stop, quick-read summary and analysis of the most relevant and important information on national transportation issues, you’ve found it.

Please contact us to receive a free trial of the Monday e-newsletter, which usually contains published on the website. Subscription rates are very affordable.

Publisher Larry Ehl scans hundreds of sources and then applies his two-plus decades of Congressional, corporate and state transportation experience to deliver what you need to know.

  • What funding and policy changes are being contemplated in DC, and what might that mean for your organization?
  • When are grant programs announced and – more importantly – what’s the real story behind the grant criteria?
  • Need more details on a specific topic? Follow the links we provide.
  • Need more analysis specific to your organization and situation? We’re available for short, focused, affordable consultation. 

Subscribe to Transportation Issues Daily today and start saving time while becoming more informed about what’s happening in transportation policy and funding.

Transportation Issues Daily tracks, reports on, and analyzes:

  • All transportation modes. Because all modes are critical to improved mobility, community and economic vitality.
  • Congress and federal agencies. Because they’re creating and interpreting laws, and establishing funding.
  • Think tanks and interest groups. Because they influence federal officials – and the public.
  • Political & trade press, blogs, & Twitter. Because it’s critical to understand the politics and public opinion.